Story Telling for Children of Incarcerated Parents

Story Telling for Children of Incarcerated Parents

Children who have parents in prison may be isolated, stigmatized, and feel lonely. These feelings may lead to other psychological problems. Research shows that mentoring at risk children and sharing stories with them is a good way to help them (1)  understand they are not alone and (2) develop coping strategies that fit their lifestyle.
AGCCLogoNewMay2014Hamed Farmand, founder and president of Children of Imprisoned Parents International (COIPI) have plan to tell his story about his childhood when his mother was in prison, for children of incarcerated parents in Virginia. He’ll be attend the All God’s Children Camp where “children with an incarcerated mother or father, ages 7 to 12, spend a week in activities such as boating, swimming, hiking, archery, music, crafts, Bible study, and conflict resolution”.  “Partnering with Virginia United Methodist camps, the All God’s Children Camp provides a week of sanctuary for children who face so many challenges in their lives: economic poverty; temporary living conditions; loneliness; low self-esteem; violence; and drugs.” COIPI and leader of the camp believe that sharing stories with them, as well as all activities and plans in the camp could benefit children who face with trauma. Story telling program will be part of Harmony section in camp’s days when children work on their self-steam and conflict resolution.
This program run from June 26-July 1 on Keezletown.